How Computer Viruses Work

With Winter approaching, it’s time to start to thinking about how to protect yourself from the dreaded Winter flu. This year, I’d like you to include your computer in your contingency plan.  What will you do in the event of a virus? How will you insulate yourself from whatever’s going around? Nobody likes being sick. Just because your computer’s an inanimate object, doesn’t mean it has no feelings. Ok, so your computer doesn’t have feelings. One thing is certain, though- your computer will react just as strongly to invading bacteria as you would to a bout of gastro. To put it in rather crass terms, it will lose it’s guts.

Let’s look a little more closely at what a computer virus is. Simply put, it’s a computer program that can replicate itself. In your body, if a bunch of rogue cells go crazy and start multiplying, you’re in big trouble. Computer viruses work in an almost identical fashion.

Some viruses do nothing more than reproduce themselves and won’t cause any serious issues,  but others are of a far more malevolent nature and can harm or destroy a computer system’s data and performance. They’re not always easy to spot, though some do call attention to themselves if you know what to look for. Anti-malware software is a far better bet than relying on your own two eyes.

A great anti-virus program is going to be completely useless, however, if you don’t take the time to regularly update it. Make sure your anti virus software self-updates, otherwise you’ll need to do it yourself.

To learn more about computer viruses, contact the experts at www.supergeek.com.au.

 

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